Utilizing 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 to prevent the appearance of diabetic-like phenotypes in Drosophila melanogaster

(1) American Heritage School, Plantation, Florida

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Currently, over 415 million people worldwide have diabetes and within that population, 90–95% have type 2 diabetes; increasingly more children and young adults are also developing it. This study aimed to assess the role of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 solution, at varying concentrations, in protecting vertical transmission of diabetic-like phenotypes. Fruit flies were suitable model organisms, as they share 75% of the disease-causing genes with humans and can develop diet-induced insulin resistance when reared on high-sucrose diets (HSDs). All fly groups (including parents and offspring) were utilized for assays including measuring adult body mass, wing size, and glucose and sugars content. We hypothesized that the highest concentration of vitamin D solution (55 ng/mL) would be most effective in having a protective role. The results indicated that the hypothesis was partially supported; overall, all three concentrations of the vitamin D solution administered to the flies reared on HSDs had a protective effect, to varying extents. Therefore, these results can be applied to show the role of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 as a potential treatment for type 2 diabetes.

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diabetes vitamin d drosophilia